Susan Popoola

Leveraging The Value of People
February 25th, 2015 by SusanPopoola

Unwarranted Segregation?

When I speak in Schools and Colleges on issues of diversity, inclusion and engagement, I have on occasion shown a BNP video in which a member of the BNP questions why black people have so many groups, organisations and representation such as the Black Police Association, Music of Black Origin, Black Nurses Association if they want to be part of British Society.

I typically ask the group whether the woman in the video has a point. At times this leads to a discussion at times people are hesitant to respond and I go on speak about some of the historical issues of exclusion of black people in British society around areas such as housing, work and even religion. Exclusions that often led black people to set up their own groups, churches and various organisations and societies.

It still leaves the questions as to whether these set ups are still needed today. After all, that was then this is now. In fact a few weeks ago I ended up in an extended discussion with someone about this at the Royal Society of Arts. Sometimes I also begin to question the relevance of such ‘structures’ today.

Then we get to the awards season for the entertainment industry – focused on America, but with Global implications. Throughout the season to date frustrations have been expressed about the limited representation of black artistes in various award categories regardless of their achievements.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/02/20/oscars-diversity-problem_n_6709334.html

At this point I believe it becomes difficult to challenge the structures that represent black achievement, advancement and goals. (Unless you can convince me that this is just an American issue)

Selah

Susan Popoola runs Conning Towers Ltd, an HR organisation focused on Talent Management and HR Transformation and Engaged For Success a Social Enterprise. She is also the published author of Touching The Heart of Milton Keynes: A Social Perspective and Consequences: Diverse to Mosaic Britain. She is also Winner Women4Africa Author of the Year 2013

Copyright 2015. This document is the specific intellectual property of Susan Popoola. Content may not be reused or reproduced without the specific permission of the owner or a reference to the source. Opinions may be generated

February 10th, 2015 by SusanPopoola

Do You Give Due Credit?

I’m looking forward to watching the film, Selma. Everything that I’ve heard about it indicates that it is a film that is well worth watching.

With it being award season, the frustration has been expressed about the limited diversity and representation of black artistes amongst the various categories for different awards ceremonies, especially when you have a film, which is as highly proclaimed as Selma released within the season.

Against this backdrop, it was nice to learn that a few songs from the film SELMA would be featured in this years Grammy. This has, however, led to some controversy of it’s own. The song, “Take My Hand Precious Lord” was sung by Beyonce at the Grammys. However, in the film itself the role of Mahalia Jackson is performed by a lovely Jazzy, earthy soul singer named Ledisi who I’m sure very ably sings the song in the film.

When John Legend was asked was asked why Beyonce was chosen to sing the song (instead of Ledisi) he is said to have responded, “Beyonce requested to sing the song and the offer was to good to pass up”. He is said to have said, “You don’t really say no to Beyonce if she asks to perform with you” he is said to have told a magazine.

When asked about the situation, Ledisi who would have been sitting in the audience provided a very gracious response, saying that she had, had the privilege to sing the song following on from legends such as Mahilia Jackson and Aretha Franklin and that now Beyonce was singing it and taking it to a different generation/audience.

I must say that I question John Legend’s defence that he could not turn Beyonce down. Maybe that’s the type of argument that comes to play when it comes to nominations for the various awards ceremonies, which do not represent the diversity of society.

Critically, I found myself reflecting on this in relation in relation to the workplace. You’ll probably say you don’t do things like this or if you do, it’s totally justified.

However, if you have capable staff with a fair amount of experience who work around the clock for your organisation, providing input to key projects, who are never thanked or publically acknowledged them maybe you are.

If you see the role of such staff to be to sit quietly in meetings without expressing an input; if you expect them to adhere to changes without ever having any say in what the changes may be, then you probably are.   I could go on, but I won’t. Hopefully you can see my point.

There are obviously limits, but if you want them to continually give their best; to be fully engaged and stay with you for the long term. Do ensure that you f recognise what they have to offer, fully acknowledge them; involve them and make the most of them. If the people that we don’t fully appreciate have half of the talent of Ledisi, then we are doing not only them, but also ourselves a major disservice.

#Selah

Susan Popoola runs Conning Towers Ltd, an HR organisation focused on Talent Management and HR Transformation and Engaged For Success a Social Enterprise. She is also the published author of Touching The Heart of Milton Keynes: A Social Perspective and Consequences: Diverse to Mosaic Britain. She is also Winner Women4Africa Author of the Year 2013

Copyright 2015. This document is the specific intellectual property of Susan Popoola. Content may not be reused or reproduced without the specific permission of the owner or a reference to the source. Opinions may be generated

 

January 17th, 2015 by SusanPopoola

The Talent Left on Your Doorstep

I was at one of my favourite music venues, The Stables in Milton Keynes on Sunday. I went to listen to a lady named Sally Barker play. If you live in the UK and watched the TV completion, The Voice last year you will probably know who I’m talking as she was the first runner up.

Sally was great on The Voice. I absolutely loved her rendition of songs or better, put her interpretation of them. When I heard that she was going to be playing in Milton Keynes, it was a given that I was going to be there to listen to her.

It was lovely to hear her perform a number of the songs that she had sang on The Voice and I can say that she gives Dionne Warwick a run for her money with her version of “Walk on By”. Equally, it was lovely to hear her sing a number of her own songs that she has written herself over the years. She also does a very good job on the guitar, a skill that she didn’t display whilst she was on The Voice. In addition, I discovered that she has a great sense of humour, she’s a great conversationalist and has a deep interest in history.

I found out that following on from The Voice, she had been offered a contract with Universal Music. She had, however, turned it down. They wanted her to record an album of covers, but she was not satisfied with this. Remember I said she writes her own songs. She therefore wanted to record her own material. She has since re-released one of her older albums, “Maid in England” including some of the songs that she sang on The Voice.

I believe that Sally is a talented, world class performer and that by not accepting her for who she truly is and what she represents and has to offer, Universal Music actually lost out. As she told the story, I found myself thinking of the talent in the workplace.

We typically recruit people on the basis of job descriptions – totally understandable. We’ve got to have some parameters. However, do we ever take the time to understand the additional skills that people have to offer and where appropriate make use of those skills. I’ve seen research that indicates that a third of employees are likely to look for new jobs this year. I believe highly skilled and capable employees that don’t fill full appreciated or utilised are likely to be high on the list of people looking for new opportunities where they will be truly fulfilled.

Equally common, is the habit of recruiting staff with great skills and talents that we identify and indicate that we very much admire during the recruitment process, which we then fail to utilise once they are in our employ. Dictating that they perform a role which does not utilise these capabilities or that they perform tasks in a (procedural) manner that does not optimise that which they have to offer, that we originally said we admire.

It’s not just about talent. I’ve heard people express the frustration that they can’t fully express themselves and be who they are within the workplace. This is especially true of people from diverse backgrounds who have been told that they should act in a certain way in order to conform and be accepted. Yes, there are limits, but do you encourage the people that work with you to freely be who they are within the workplace?

If you do, I believe that you will find yourself with a much fulfilled and effective workforce. If not, I would strongly recommend that you start to do so.

Selah

P.S. Oh, and if you appreciate good music; if Sally Barker is ever in your town make sure you go along. I’m sure you won’t be disappointed.

Susan Popoola is an HR Specialist at Conning Towers which specializes in HR Transformation and Talent Management.  Consequences: Diverse to Mosaic Britain which explores Disatisfaction, Disengagement and Diversity within Britain is her second published book.

January 17th, 2015 by SusanPopoola

The Spirit of an Explorer

If you have the spirit of an explorer, sometimes you set out on a path without actually knowing where it will lead.

But it will lead somewhere and if it’s not where you want to be you can turn back and start over or start from where the path seized to feel right.

But mind you don’t turn back to soon as by pressing on you may find you’re actually on a desirable path.

Selah

Susan Popoola runs Conning Towers Ltd, an HR organisation focused on Talent Management and HR Transformation and Engaged For Success a Social Enterprise. She is also the published author of Touching The Heart of Milton Keynes: A Social Perspective and Consequences: Diverse to Mosaic Britain. She is also Winner Women4Africa Author of the Year 2013

Copyright 2015. This document is the specific intellectual property of Susan Popoola. Content may not be reused or reproduced without the specific permission of the owner or a reference to the source. Opinions may be generated

December 24th, 2014 by SusanPopoola

Do They Know It’s Christmas?

A couple of months back I was at a friend’s place. We were just having a general conversation when an appeal message for children in need in Africa was shown on television. As is often the case with such adverts, malnourished children with very little clothing were shown. Mid-sentence, my friend paused in our conversation and glared at the television. “Why are they always portraying Africa like this?” she exclaimed. I tried to point out that there are people in need and such adverts are aimed at getting the necessary support to help them. She wasn’t having it though, “ how many people in Africa actually live like that?” she retorted. She went on to explain that her seven-year daughter had recently asked her why they were always showing children like that on television. My friend happens to be from Senegal and though her two children were born in France they have, visited Senegal on a couple of occasions. They do not come from a rich background; in fact to be honest, her family at home are from a poor, rural community. However, her daughter’s experience of Africa was in no way aligned to what she was seeing on television.

I had this at the back of my mind, when Bob Geldof assembled a number of British artists to record a new version of “Do they know it’s Christmas” in order to help raise funds to help combat Ebola in Africa. It may be for this reason that I felt a sense of disquiet about the recording. I therefore thought that after a few days the feeling would go away – it didn’t. In fact as I observed the artistes; listened to the lyrics; and watched Sir Bob Geldof say that you don’t have to like the lyrics to buy the song and go on to say that people who did not like what he was doing should get lost (polite version). My disquiet grew. This feeling was further heightened by the ‘chants’ of people who said that anything negative about the campaign was eclipsed by the objective, which was to help. I further found myself squirming and struggling to hold my tongue when I heard a young man pronounce that he was sure that the people in Africa would be grateful for ANY help offered to them.

Less you may be thinking, isn’t it true? Let me say no, it’s not, most especially not in this day and age. More pertinently if you really want to help anyone who you perceive to be in need, be it a friend, a family member or someone in some distant land, if you want to be effective, you do need to take the time to truly understand their position, their needs and what they are actually doing to help themselves.

So here are my problems with the “Do they know it’s Christmas” campaign:

At the most superficial level, even with the changes, to the lyrics are not representative of Africa. It’s only certain parts of West Africa that have been affected by Ebola and without question the people of Africa know that it’s Christmas. There are churches all over the place and if you just listen to any African at home or abroad talk about their Christmas festivities you will know that they know when Christmas is, even if their perspective is a bit different from yours.

More important though, Geldof could have included some African artists in the track or better still promoted one of the songs that had ALREADY been recorded by African artists to raise awareness and help combat the disease. One that particular stands out to me is a song, “Trust the Doctors”, sang by renowned African artists who sing of Ebola as an invisible enemy. The song is actually very educational.

Yes, the typical person in Britain doesn’t know the artistes and probably wouldn’t understand the song since it’s in French with verses in a number of different African languages. However, Geldof did say, you don’t have to like the “Do they know it’s Christmas, but people should just buy it to suit the cause. The same principal can therefore apply to the African songs aimed at combating Ebola. Otherwise, what we are saying: African efforts are irrelevant and therefore we are going to do our own thing to help you. That you as Africans are not capable? Mind you, proceeds from the song that I have highlighted go to medicine san frontier.

If Geldof had got behind the promotion of such as song, aside from the funds that it would have generated, it would have demonstrated to people that are tired of the constant appeals to support Africa such as the one that frustrated my friend, that Africans are also doing things to help themselves. It would have also created an awareness of African cultural and some very good African artistes.

You see there, is a need for a change in perception and attitude towards Africa. When we had black Friday and everyday people in England were shown pushing and shoving in a bid to get items which they may or may not need, someone showed this in comparison to hungry, malnourished children in Africa stretching their hands out begging for food.

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Yes, there are some children like this in Africa, but if it didn’t happen this year, within the next few years there will be black Friday in Africa with people fighting for goods which they may or may not need just as we have in England. More pertinently, there are a number of Africans that I know, that have no interests in such sales because they can readily afford to buy such items at more than double the recommended retail price.

So as we celebrate Christmas here in the West, rest assured that in Africa they not only know that it’s Christmas, but they will most definitely be celebrating as well. I believe the best Christmas present to Africa this year and for all the years going forward will be provide them with help and support from a position of greater understanding of the where they are and to support their own efforts and self identified needs.

Merry Christmas everyone

#Selah

Susan Popoola runs Conning Towers Ltd, an HR organisation focused on Talent Management and HR Transformation and Engaged For Success a Social Enterprise. She is also the published author of Touching The Heart of Milton Keynes: A Social Perspective and Consequences: Diverse to Mosaic Britain. She is also Winner Women4Africa Author of the Year 2013

Copyright 2014. This document is the specific intellectual property of Susan Popoola. Content may not be reused or reproduced without the specific permission of the owner or a reference to the source. Opinions may be generated

 

December 14th, 2014 by SusanPopoola

Little Sister’s Watching Your Brand

A local store close to where I live recently closed for refurbishment. I t re-opened under a different brand, however, browsing round the store and picking up a few pieces I noticed that the staff were largely the same. I went to pay for my items, smiling back at the sales assistant who I’d seen many times before under the old brand, I asked her how she was. “Fine thank you, she responded and how you?” Completing normal pleasantries, I went on to comment on the change to the store, asking her whether the change was a positive thing. Well, it’s better pay for us she responded. That’s good I said. As she checked out my items, she expanded that there was also a greater variety of items for customers and the quality was better with good prices. She went on to ask me if I had one of the brands store cards. Completing my transaction, I went away thinking positively of the store. I would be back, with a confidence about the store – their products, the way they treat their staff and their customers. She had done a great job of marketing the brand without even realising it.

The truth is employees often do. I learn a lot because I have the tendency to interact with staff because I’m interested in them as people. Recently, a friend took me out for dinner as a late birthday treat. We were served by a lovely waitress who patiently came back several times as we kept talking instead of deciding what we wanted to order from the menu. Eventually, I asked her what she would recommend and she politely made a few suggestions, demonstrating a good knowledge of the restaurant’s menu. During brief interactions as she served and cleared the table we learnt that she was moving to a new job in a different industry. We wished her well. As she thanked us, she said that she would miss working at the restaurant that we were dining at pointing out that she had worked in about 10 different eateries and that this was her favourite. I was pleased to here this, as it happens to be one of my favourite restaurants. I would have been somewhat concerned if she had spoke negatively about it. Not only did I think, that I would happily go back again. I also thought that it would be high on the list of places that I would recommend to anyone I knew looking for a waitressing job.

It’s quite different from an experience that I had, had about a month earlier at a different restaurant. The food was okay – nothing to get excited about, but it was cheap and you basically got what you paid for. The waitress who served us was just as polite and competent as the other waitress that I met a month later. Her report of the restaurant was very different. She spoke of how they had tried to pay her below the minimum wage until she had challenged them. She also mentioned how they were inflexible with her hours, constantly asking her to work late hours that meant that she had to walk home in the dark all by herself and I should say that she was only 17. Even though I had a good time with my friend and I was okay with the food, I will think twice before I go back to this restaurant.

I have the tendency to chat quite a bit with staff in restaurants, stores and wherever I go. My starting point is not you and your brand. It’s that these are people that are providing me with a service and that I’m interested in them as people and their welfare. It concerns me if I learn that they that they don’t believe that you value them and treat them well. At times, I’m amazed at how much I learn from them about you.

Maybe they say more to me about you then they say to the average customer/client that they meet, but don’t doubt that they do talk. I do have staff that volunteer information without me soliciting anything from them.

The truth is even if they don’t say anything to people like myself walking through the door of your establishment; they will go home and talk to friends and family. They may even talk to people they meet on their journey to and from work, at the doctors or when they are out shopping. So be aware ‘little sister is watching your brand and learning about it from your employees and may react for good or for bad. So do you know what your employees are saying about you?

#Selah

 

Susan Popoola runs Conning Towers Ltd, an HR organisation focused on Talent Management and HR Transformation and Engaged For Success a Social Enterprise. She is also the published author of Touching The Heart of Milton Keynes: A Social Perspective and Consequences: Diverse to Mosaic Britain. She is also Winner Women4Africa Author of the Year 2013

Copyright 2014. This document is the specific intellectual property of Susan Popoola. Content may not be reused or reproduced without the specific permission of the owner or a reference to the source. Opinions may be generated

November 2nd, 2014 by SusanPopoola

The Myth About Who You Require for The Job

Recently I was walking past a small café. Outside was a sign – “Full Time Position Available. Experienced Only Need Apply” I smiled whirly as in some ways it reminded me of the stories that you hear about rooms for rent in properties back in the 1960s (or even later) with signs in the windows reading – “No Blacks, No Irish, No Dogs”

On the face of things, there is no correlation between telling people not to apply for a job if they don’t have experience and telling people that they can’t rent a property because of the colour of their skin or where they originate from. However, if you stop and think about it, in both circumstances people are being excluded, without being given a chance. No one is or was taking the time to find out who they are and what they do have offer.

The experience case is probably easier to justify – people say they need someone who can come onto the job and get on with what needs to be done. The requirement for experience often comes with assumptions. About eight years ago I came across an organisation that was looking for HR experience in a specialised area. The organisation specified the requirement for five years experience. I had about three years extensive experience in the relevant area so, I decided to contact the organisation outlining the projects I’d work on over a three-year period and the impact of my achievements. They decided not to see me. About three years later, they were once more looking for help. In the interim period I had done a few small pieces of work in the specialist area, but not much. I contacted them once more, specifying my experience over five years. They met with me and they absolutely loved me and my work. The funny thing is that what really stood out for them from the conversation was the experience they I had gained from my earlier years. The experience that I had when I first contacted them. Ultimately, what was more pertinent, the length of my experience or the quality of my experience?

You may go on to say, that a place like the Café that I mentioned needs to employ someone with experience – they don’t have time to teach people from scratch, you might think! However, if you think about it, who would the Café or for that matter anyone else be best of with – a person with a fair amount of experience who is used to doing things in certain ways which may not actually be appropriate to the culture or general way of working of the new environment, who thinks they know it all or someone who is perhaps a quick and keen learner with no preconceived ideas.

My driving instructor explained it best. She said the easiest person to teach to drive is a person who has never been behind a steering wheel. It’s much harder, she said to teach someone who has got behind the wheel and picked up a lot of bad habits.

I believe there are other areas in which we consciously or sub-consciously exclude people without giving them a chance because they don’t have the experience or capabilities that we think we need. For instance with Christmas coming up I’ve just received a little card through my front door from Royal Mail. “Santa isn’t the only one who needs help this Christmas” because of the increased volumes of mail over Christmas they are looking to recruit people from the local community to help deliver their services.

They specify that it “is a fast paced environment where you will need to be flexible and adaptable, changing from one role to another to move the mail quickly along the processing chain” Imaging the environment I could immediately understand why they had specified the requirement like that. However, I couldn’t help but think that if I was someone with a mobility problem of some kind that I would immediately think that they did not want someone such as me. The truth, however, is that Royal Mail could cope with a few such people that would be perfectly good for the job if they were allowed to work in specific areas without having to move from one role to another. In fact they might actually benefit from some people focused on specific roles whilst others move around as required.

It’s easy to exclude people that could add a lot of value without realising it or without meaning to simply by taking the obvious, routine approach without thinking of the implications.

On the other hand,  if we take a little bit of extra time to think of how our messages come across, who they may exclude and then think a bit outside of the box, we may be surprised by the gems that come knocking at our doors.

Selah

Susan Popoola runs Conning Towers Ltd, an HR organisation focused on Talent Management and HR Transformation. She is also the published author of Touching The Heart of Milton Keynes: A Social Perspective and Consequences: Diverse to Mosaic Britain.

 

 

October 27th, 2014 by SusanPopoola

Enabling Creativity

Employability skills has become mainstream terminology in the business world, especially when it comes to the employment of young people who are often criticised as not coming out of education equipped with the appropriate skills for the workplace i.e. employability skills.

As defined by the Confederation of British Industry (CBI) the key employability skills are:

  •  A Positive Attitude – readiness to take part, openness to new ideas and activities, desire to achieve
  • Self Management – readiness to accept responsibility, flexibility, time management, readiness to improve own performance
  • Team working – respecting others, co-operating, negotiating/persuading, contributing to discussions
  • Business and Customer Awareness – basic understanding of the key drivers for business success and the need to provide customer satisfaction
  • Problem solving – analysing facts and circumstances and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions
  • Communication and literacy – application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy, including listening and questioning.
  • Application and Numeracy – application of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts
  • Application of Information Technology – basic IT skills, including familiarity with word processing, spreadsheets, file management and the use of internet search engines.

In my mind, a number of these are related and are aligned to the natural curiosity and creativity that we all have as children. In many ways we process this out of children, by dictating not just what has to be done, but specifically how things need to be done. I believe this is followed through into the workplace. Without question there is a need for guidance on the how, especially when people are learning. However, there is a need for people to be able to use their initiative, to be flexible and to be responsive to specific needs.

I often see how over prescribed processes limit employees ability to work effectively. I believe this is, however, best highlighted by an episode of the television programme, Undercover Boss that featured DHL. On one particular day, the boss worked with a member of staff in the call centre, which had very specific flow chart processes on how staff responded to customer calls. This meant that when a customer called from Australia with a concern that she had previously called about which was yet to be resolved and asked to be put on hold, the staff member refused, as it was not in line with protocol. The undercover boss was quite annoyed by this, however, when confronted at a later stage, the employee pointed out that she had followed the (target driven process) and if she had done otherwise she may have got into trouble. It could be argued that she took things to the extreme.

However, if we really want to encourage skills amongst employees such as positive attitudes; self management; business and customer awareness and problem solving; we need to enable them by adopting processes that provide frameworks and guidance without dictating the details of how things need to be done.

Dictating the how, not only limits creativity in the workplace, I believe it also limits trust as it send a message that says that we don’t trust in employee’s capabilities and we therefore need to tell them precisely what to do and how to do it.

Selah

Susan Popoola

Susan Popoola is a professional Human Resources Specialist with close to 20 years HR experience working on numerous HR related projects across the Private, Public & Voluntary sectors.

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October 26th, 2014 by SusanPopoola

First impressions count, but so do Second Impressions

First impressions count, but so do second impressions. I was reminded of this recently when I recently met someone at an event who I’d previously met, but not really taken to the first time that we met. Basically, if I’m to be honest, I found him a bit too pushy in his sales pitch.

However, on the recent occasion when I met him, he saw me from a distance and gave to me with a big smile on his face. “Hello Susan”, he said. “How are you and how’s business?” I was surprised, not only did he remember my face, he remembered my name when I had thought that he’s sole focus had been to push his agenda. He proceeded to have a good conversation, updating each on what we were both doing.

On my way home I found myself reflecting on this situation. He is really quite a nice guy – knowledgeable and intelligent with a willingness to help. If had not met him for a second time or had snobbed him when I’d seen him because of my first impression. He may have lost out from a potential relationship which could end up being beneficial to him, but also to me.

So yes, judge people on your first impression of them, but keep an open mind as for good or for bad, they may turn out to be different from what you original thought.

Selah

Copyright 2014. This document is the specific intellectual property of Susan Popoola. Content may not be reused or reproduced without the specific permission of the owner or a reference to the source. Opinions may be generated

 

October 5th, 2014 by SusanPopoola

Don’t Mind My Tattoos

I find tattoos fascinating. I don’t know that I’d ever get one though; I don’t ‘do’ needles unless I absolutely have to. To me they represent unnecessary pain. Besides, I can’t think of anything that I would like permanently marked on my body. However, as I said, on other people they are quite fascinating. I’ve had many a conversation with people about their tattoos – why they got them and what they represent. A couple of people have even let me take photographs of their tattoos such as the young man that had a tattoo with the words, “We Are Punished For Our Virtues” He’d been through a lot of challenges in life and wanted to start over. To him the tattoo represented his new start.

Virtues Tattoo

 

Recently, I was watching Undercover Boss. The boss happened to meet a young worker with seven different tattoos on her body. In discussion with her, he found out that she had lost seven different people that were close to her including her parents. She had got a different tattoo for each one of them. She pointed out that having the tattoos, she felt that they were there with her wherever she went. I’ve actually found that tattoos in memory of people are quite common.

RIP Tattoo

 

Within the business environment we are generally not too particular about tattoos – especially when they are visible. We believe they are not a good representation of a business. Although, it’s not something that I have really spend a lot of time thinking about, it is often a subject of debate within Human Resources with some organisations having a clear policy of not employing people with visible tattoos.

As I said, I don’t have a clear, view, but if we do turn people down because of their tattoos, it may mean that we turn down someone trying to make a new start whose tattoo serves as a reminder or the young lady who used her tattoos as a way of coping with her loses. Yes, I’m sure they could have used other strategies, but this is the option that they went for, which actually works for them… unless we refuse to give them a chance based on the strategy that they have chosen.

I guess the key is if we are going to adopt anti-tattoo policies, let’s make sure that we are really clear about our reasoning for them.

Selah

Susan Popoola runs Conning Towers Ltd, an HR organisation focused on Talent Management and HR Transformation and Engaged For Success a Social Enterprise. She is also the published author of Touching The Heart of Milton Keynes: A Social PerspectiveandConsequences: Diverse to Mosaic Britain. She is also Winner Women4Africa Author of the Year 2013

Copyright 2014. This document is the specific intellectual property of Susan Popoola. Content may not be reused or reproduced without the specific permission of the owner or a reference to the source. Opinions may be generated